4ad-l Mail for 06-22-1996

Mail in Archive

Subject: Re: Record Catalogues
Date: Sat, 22 Jun 1996 01:32:29 -0400
From: Srilank@AOL.COM
Subject: His Name is Alive flexi/Warped Reality
Date: Sat, 22 Jun 1996 01:19:26 -0400
From: afeldman@ACS.BU.EDU
Subject: Krzysztof Kieslowski (sp?)
Date: Sat, 22 Jun 1996 02:28:25 -0400
From: afeldman@ACS.BU.EDU
Subject: Re: Philip Glass recommendations
Date: Sat, 22 Jun 1996 13:09:16 GMT
From: "C.K. Coney" (ckc.atlanta@POSTOFFICE.WORLDNET.ATT.NET)
Subject: Re: Krzysztof Kieslowski (sp?)
Date: Sat, 22 Jun 1996 13:17:31 GMT
From: "C.K. Coney" (ckc.atlanta@POSTOFFICE.WORLDNET.ATT.NET)
Subject: new Church
Date: Sat, 22 Jun 1996 10:38:55 -0400
From: ulangilah (larry@INTERLOG.COM)
Subject: Re: Michael Brook
Date: Sat, 22 Jun 1996 17:02:43 GMT
From: "Robert A. Szkolnicki" (Robert_A._Szkolnicki@mit.bison.mb.ca)
Subject: new Church
Date: Sat, 22 Jun 1996 12:38:33 -0400
From: Gregory Lawrence Smith (gt7003b@PRISM.GATECH.EDU)
Subject: Re: nme web goods
Date: Sat, 22 Jun 1996 16:51:05 GMT
From: "Robert A. Szkolnicki" (Robert_A._Szkolnicki@mit.bison.mb.ca)
Subject: Re: Krzysztof Kieslowski (sp?)
Date: Sat, 22 Jun 1996 23:17:00 -0400
From: BluBelKnol@AOL.COM

Date: Sat, 22 Jun 1996 01:32:29 -0400
From: Srilank@AOL.COM
Subject: Re: Record Catalogues


>Try Intergalactic Garage in Shephardstown, WV, USA...I haven't used them yet
>but I've heard much good. I don't have their web address handy...you can
>surf for it, I'm sure. Good luck!

Not that I work for the "Foundation for a better tomorrow if and when the
listies of 4AD collectively do not use Intergalactic Garage mail-order
coalition"
*but* I have NOT had very good luck with them.

However, I can recommend these--

ear@xmission.com
(EAR/Rational Music)

bcrayon@en.com
(Bent Crayon)

and Parasol.

"How much do you spend on cds a week??"- record store girl to me.

jason

srilank@aol.com

Date: Sat, 22 Jun 1996 01:19:26 -0400
From: afeldman@ACS.BU.EDU
Subject: His Name is Alive flexi/Warped Reality


> the store i work for just received the latest _warped reality_ mag that has
> a flexi with "psychotic now" by prolapse and "my canada" from his name is
> alive.  also, it contains good interviews with laika, pram, and others.  if
> anyone can't find this, let me know and i'll pick up the remaining one if
> it's still there.


Ok, methinks it's time for another plug.

Warped Reality #4 is out and features a flexi with tracks from HIS NAME IS
ALIVE "My Canada" and PROLAPSE "Psychotic Now"

The issue is a benefit for the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund, and all proceeds
will be going to support comic artists who are in litigation due to
censorship. There are words & pictures on and off the topic of censorship
GREGORY (Naughty Bits), EXENE CERVENKOVA, LOIS (Maffeo) & many more.

But wait, there's still more! Interviews with LAIKA, PRAM, LIDA HUSIK and
NEIL GAIMAN (Sandman)

all this for only $4 ppd. truly, a bargain.

send checks or concealed cash to:

Andrea Feldman
Warped Reality
PO Box 2515
Providence, RI 02906

whatever else you want to email us about.


Andrea & Susan
Editorial Powers-That-Be

P.S. thanks to those who've already ordered issues. they just went out and you
can expect them shortly.


Date: Sat, 22 Jun 1996 02:28:25 -0400
From: afeldman@ACS.BU.EDU
Subject: Krzysztof Kieslowski (sp?)


All this talk of Kieslowski has pulled me out of lurkdom. The Brattle theatre
in Cambridge has just concluded a 2-month long Kieslowski tribute that
featured essentially all of his available work, including all 10 parts of the
Decalogue. And they'll be re-running the Decalogue in September.

I've had the Color Trilogy and Veronique on my "to-rent" list for at least a
couple of months, and still haven't gotten around to seeing them, but I
couldn't pass up what might be my only chance to see his early work on the big
screen.

So, I went to see Part 1 of the Decalogue, and was so blown away, I ended up
seeing almost the whole thing. I expected something beautiful in the same way
that a sepia-toned photograph is beautiful, but Kieslowski's films are neither
flat nor monochromatic. They're full of real, vibrant people and situations
that never seem exaggerated (even if they are)

Each film is about moral choices - love, death, the process of living, and the
choices we face everyday

My favorites were 1, 5, 6 and 10. Five and Six were expanded into "A Short
Film About Love" and "A Short Film About Killing" Unfortunately, "Killing" is
lost. The Brattle was supposed to show it and found out that only a few copies
remain, inaccessible in Poland.

The Decalogue is almost a film equivalent to Edward Munch's "The Scream". Each
character cries out with such desperation that it's heart-rending. But their
cries aren't the howls of the bereaved, rather the inner desperation of
ordinary people going about ordinary lives. Kieslowski details each moment in
such perfect clarity that it seems an eternity to us, just as it does to
them. Truly meditations on life and the nature of love, each moment is a
pregnant pause, imbued with meaning.

The movies are shot naturalistically, though Kieslowski's camera stops to
ponder small details in the same manner as Raymond Carver or Adrian Tomine. A
small child cries out "Mom!" and you look up with a small gasp, as does the
father in part 1. A shot of a frozen milk bottle, its glass clouded over with
frost is breathtaking, even moreso when the ice is reduced to a melted puddle
by the end. Even as the films draw to their inevitable conclusion, the
anticipation and dread still make the endings seem like O'Henryish twists, the
cruel hand of fate intervening in what could have been a happy ending. But
life rarely has happy endings, at least not unexpected ones, and neither do
Kieslowski's films. Part 2 has a seemingly happy denouement, but as we share
the husband's elation, we recall the beauty and horror that led us to that
point.

Like Edward Gorey, Kieslowski can see beauty and horror in everything. A
child's pair of ice skates can be equated with fun or with death. A fly in a
jar of strawberries is sickening even as it foreshadows its owner's will to
live. Lest you think all is unremittingly grim, there is humor and joy along
with the sadness. Life and death are never in opposition, rather the ombre of
death is life-affirming as it exhorts us to grasp what we can of the fleeting
beauty inherent in simple moments. Kieslowski's world is the same as ours,
only viewed more intensely.

  -Susan

before. And the Brattle hosted a Kristin Hersh show last month.

if anyone knows where i can rent "a short film about killing", let me know.


Date: Sat, 22 Jun 1996 13:09:16 GMT
From: "C.K. Coney" (ckc.atlanta@POSTOFFICE.WORLDNET.ATT.NET)
Subject: Re: Philip Glass recommendations


At 20:40 6/20/96 +0000, you wrote:
>On 6/20/96 you wrote:
>
>   >>>I think "Mishima" is his finest moment. Incredibly dramatic; a    m
>  mixture of full orchestra with percussion, large string ensemble, and
>  string quartet. A must-buy; if any of you don't like this I will
>  personally drop by and whup you upside da haid*.<<
>
>        Well, I can't argue with that...I suppose you've seen the movie,
>eh? What a film. Ken Ogata's portrayal is very very moving as Yukio
>Mishima rationalizes his death thru art. Fascinating stuff. (Ever read
>anything by Mishima? What an incredible writer...one of the best...)
>        Mishima's death was tragic, and yet somehow inspiring...he didn't
>commit suicide for the usual reasons of personal weakness, he died out of
>a commitment to his art and his purpose. I mean, okay, the guy was a
>fascist, but he had cojones.
>
> Alex

The film is brilliant...I own it on video. I also have read several of
Mishima's books & his writing was brilliant...and that was reading em in
English, and I've heard his writing loses in translation from Japanese. Can
you imagine?!

Carol Coney
>

Date: Sat, 22 Jun 1996 13:17:31 GMT
From: "C.K. Coney" (ckc.atlanta@POSTOFFICE.WORLDNET.ATT.NET)
Subject: Re: Krzysztof Kieslowski (sp?)


At 06:28 6/22/96 +0000, you wrote:
>All this talk of Kieslowski has pulled me out of lurkdom. The Brattle theatre
>in Cambridge has just concluded a 2-month long Kieslowski tribute that
>featured essentially all of his available work, including all 10 parts of the
>Decalogue. And they'll be re-running the Decalogue in September.
>
>I've had the Color Trilogy and Veronique on my "to-rent" list for at least a
>couple of months, and still haven't gotten around to seeing them, but I
>couldn't pass up what might be my only chance to see his early work on the big
>screen.
>
>So, I went to see Part 1 of the Decalogue, and was so blown away, I ended up
>seeing almost the whole thing. I expected something beautiful in the same way
>that a sepia-toned photograph is beautiful, but Kieslowski's films are neither
>flat nor monochromatic. They're full of real, vibrant people and situations
>that never seem exaggerated (even if they are)
>
>Each film is about moral choices - love, death, the process of living, and the
>choices we face everyday
>
>My favorites were 1, 5, 6 and 10. Five and Six were expanded into "A Short
>Film About Love" and "A Short Film About Killing" Unfortunately, "Killing" is
>lost. The Brattle was supposed to show it and found out that only a few copies
>remain, inaccessible in Poland.
>
>The Decalogue is almost a film equivalent to Edward Munch's "The Scream". Each
>character cries out with such desperation that it's heart-rending. But their
>cries aren't the howls of the bereaved, rather the inner desperation of
>ordinary people going about ordinary lives. Kieslowski details each moment in
>such perfect clarity that it seems an eternity to us, just as it does to
>them. Truly meditations on life and the nature of love, each moment is a
>pregnant pause, imbued with meaning.
>
>The movies are shot naturalistically, though Kieslowski's camera stops to
>ponder small details in the same manner as Raymond Carver or Adrian Tomine. A
>small child cries out "Mom!" and you look up with a small gasp, as does the
>father in part 1. A shot of a frozen milk bottle, its glass clouded over with
>frost is breathtaking, even moreso when the ice is reduced to a melted puddle
>by the end. Even as the films draw to their inevitable conclusion, the
>anticipation and dread still make the endings seem like O'Henryish twists, the
>cruel hand of fate intervening in what could have been a happy ending. But
>life rarely has happy endings, at least not unexpected ones, and neither do
>Kieslowski's films. Part 2 has a seemingly happy denouement, but as we share
>the husband's elation, we recall the beauty and horror that led us to that
>point.
>
>Like Edward Gorey, Kieslowski can see beauty and horror in everything. A
>child's pair of ice skates can be equated with fun or with death. A fly in a
>jar of strawberries is sickening even as it foreshadows its owner's will to
>live. Lest you think all is unremittingly grim, there is humor and joy along
>with the sadness. Life and death are never in opposition, rather the ombre of
>death is life-affirming as it exhorts us to grasp what we can of the fleeting
>beauty inherent in simple moments. Kieslowski's world is the same as ours,
>only viewed more intensely.
>
>  -Susan
>
>before. And the Brattle hosted a Kristin Hersh show last month.
>
>if anyone knows where i can rent "a short film about killing", let me know.

These "director's showcase" kind of things have been making the
rounds...especially the Kieslowski catalogue. I've seen much of his stuff.
Of the trilogy I liked "White" enough to buy it...what a hoot! (I do like
comedies and quasi-comedies, anyway, so that's probably why I'm partial to
this one.)
>


Date: Sat, 22 Jun 1996 10:38:55 -0400
From: ulangilah (larry@INTERLOG.COM)
Subject: new Church


> there is a
>brand spanking new Church album out, it seems it was an ausralian
>import here ( but at $12, it seemed a baragin, if its a real Aussie
>import ).  I had no clue this was coming out right now, so if anyone
>was wondering, it certainly is.  and its darn cool! it is called
>'magician among the spirits'... it is on deep karma/white, whoever
>they are, and is distributed by Mushrooom ( as some may expect ).  and
>it contains a steve harley cover song 'ritz' if that measn anything to
>anyone.  10 tracks, 66 minutes - they do specify a mailing list and a web
>site, and an address to steve kilbey and says ' but don't expect a
>response' ! ok then :) its nice that peter koppes is back in there :)

I thought Koppes had left for good...maybe this was recorded before then?
What is the overall sound like - is it like their good stuff or that patchy
Sometime Anywhere thing?

Larry


Date: Sat, 22 Jun 1996 17:02:43 GMT
From: "Robert A. Szkolnicki" (Robert_A._Szkolnicki@mit.bison.mb.ca)
Subject: Re: Michael Brook


>On Michael Brook topic: Shona (the album) is a pile of pants. Do not waste
>your money on this.

I agree its expensive. You do not get much music for the dollar. However, I
like this "live" album more than Live at the Aquarium. There are no new
tracks on Shona, but the versions here are longer and more experimental (and
loud too). Aquarium now sounds packaged with short songs.

Because of the price maybe its for MB fans only.

Robert,
Winnipeg


Date: Sat, 22 Jun 1996 12:38:33 -0400
From: Gregory Lawrence Smith (gt7003b@PRISM.GATECH.EDU)
Subject: new Church


I would venture to say that this new album is somewhat similar to
Sometimes Anywhere.  As with that album, it is basically a collaboration
between Steve Kilbey and Marty Wilson-Piper:  Peter Koppes is only listed
in writing credits for about 2 songs, and is listed as a "guest" guitarist.

After a first listen, I would say that my favorite song is Comedown, which
was written by Kilbey alone, and I think sounds more like his better solo
stuff or older Church (it's also among the shortest tracks on the album -
most being over 6 minutes).  Most of the songs are long and meandering.  I
guess I should confess my bias - I prefer those perfect 3-4 minute pop
gems the Church used to write (Unguarded Moment, Almost With You, Electric
Lash, even Metropolis).  I found Priest=Aura to be a mixed bag, and
Sometimes Anywhere a bit worse (but still worthy of a listen).  I haven't
rendered my opinion on the new one yet.

I know this is wandering dangerously from the list topic, but...I have
most of Steve Kilbey's and Peter Koppes' solo work, but I've never heard
Marty's solo stuff.  How does it compare?

-greg
gt7003b@prism.gatech.edu

Date: Sat, 22 Jun 1996 16:51:05 GMT
From: "Robert A. Szkolnicki" (Robert_A._Szkolnicki@mit.bison.mb.ca)
Subject: Re: nme web goods


>i just pulled this off from http://www.nme.uk.co/
>
>kinda makes me ill.
>
> COCTEAU TWINS will play the opening night of Lollapalooza after a
>     surprisepersonal request from headlininers METALLICA, who claim to
>     be ardent fans. TheCocteaus also headline the NME Stage at T In The
>     Park on July 14, as wellas releasing a new single 'Violaine' on July
>     1. The release features two newtracks, 'Tranquil Eye' and
>     'Alice',featured in the latest Bernardo Bertoluccifilm, Stealing
Beauty.

I saw their show in Denver on June 18. Maybe I was expecting a quiet evening,
but I was surprised by such a rocking performance. The drums kicked, the
guitars reverbed, the vocals soared. The hard-edged rock numbers had everyone
buzzing, and the performers reacted like they were having a lot of fun.
Ambient, techno, dance, rock - they covered many bases. The show should
impress many.

Robert,
Winnipeg


Date: Sat, 22 Jun 1996 23:17:00 -0400
From: BluBelKnol@AOL.COM
Subject: Re: Krzysztof Kieslowski (sp?)


In a message dated 96-06-22 10:01:08 EDT, you write:

<< These "director's showcase" kind of things have been making the
 rounds...especially the Kieslowski catalogue. I've seen much of his stuff.
 Of the trilogy I liked "White" enough to buy it...what a hoot! (I do like
 comedies and quasi-comedies, anyway, so that's probably why I'm partial to
 this one.)
 > >>
  I seen all 3 of these videos in the trilogy available for sale at borders
for $12.99....

and I've never seen any of these films, but like so many others, have heard
so much from the list.....

just wondering if it's worth the $12.99 to buy, or if I should just rent
them....

either way, which order do they go in anyway???
~blu


erikas@evo.org, last updated by Eyesore Automation on 6-22-1996